The Windows Community Toolkit is a collection of helper functions, custom controls, and app services.

In this video, Senior Program Manager Nikola Metulev (@metulev) comes on the show to give us a walk through some of the useful tools inside of the toolkit

  • [01:19] – Getting started with the Windows Community Toolkit
  • [02:10] – Exploring the controls
  • [04:25] – A look at the WebView control
  • [06:28] – New controls for UWP
  • [07:14] – The Animation APIs
  • [13:27] – Microsoft Graph controls
  • [15:18] – Services provided in the toolkit
  • [19:58] – Getting started resources

 

The 4th of July holiday tomorrow marks the 242nd year since the United States declared independence from Great Britain. July 1st, aside from being Canada Day, also marks the start of the new fiscal year at Microsoft.

To commemorate a festive week, here’s a quick little video I rendered. 🙂

In my previous post, I featured a video on Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit (CNTK). If you’ve not heard of it, CNTK is a production-grade, open-source, deep-learning library. It’s the toolkit behind a Microsoft’s many AI initiatives.

CNTK embraces fully open development, is available on GitHub, and provides support for both Windows and Linux. The latest release packs in several enhancements: most notably Python/C++ API support, easy-to-onboard tutorials (as Python notebooks) and examples, and an easy-to-use Layers interface.

These enhancements, combined with unparalleled scalability on NVIDIA hardware, were demonstrated by both NVIDIA at SuperComputing 2016 and Cray at NIPS 2016.

These enhancements from the CNTK supported Microsoft in its recent breakthrough in speech recognition, reaching human parity in conversational speech.

The toolkit is used in all kinds of deep learning, including image, video, speech, and text data. The speakers will discuss the current features of the toolkit’s release and its application to deep learning projects.

One of the great things about .NET is that you use it to write code for multiple runtimes: .NET Core, .NET Framework, Xamarin, etc. However, this historically introduced some complexity in writing, distributing and consuming libraries.

.NET Standard solves this problem by allowing you to write code to a specification rather than specific platforms, and .NET Standard 2.0 takes it to the next level by adding over 20K new APIs to .NET Standard 1.1.

In this session, Jon Galloway explains everything you need to know about .NET Standard and show how you can start using it today.