Here’s an interesting post on techUK about the future of policing in the age of AI.

Most people, I’m sure, have seen the movie “Minority Report”, where the Police Force have a pre-crime unit using psychic individuals to predict crime before it happens. Sadly, we don’t have such an option, and it remains in the realm of science fiction. However, we do have machine learning and artificial intelligence as an alternative.

In this Data Point, Frank ponders the wider impact on jobs and businesses related to self-driving cars that are not immediately obvious. From driving schools to truck stops, everyone will feel the change.The question then becomes: how can we prepare the workforce for the impending upheaval in the job market? Will teaching to the test cut it? Or are we going to have to make learning play and play learning?

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Show Notes:

Here’s an interesting look at the cutting edge technologies just on the horizon of AI research and what problems they can potentially solve that current techniques can’t.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is dominated by pattern recognition techniques. Recently, major advances have been made in the fields of image recognition, machine translation, audio processing and several others thanks to the development and refinement of deep learning. But deep learning is not the cure for every problem. In fact, […]

Here’s a video focusing on the “existential risks” facing humanity and why the 21st century is like no other.

While I think some of this is fear mongering, the video does raise some interesting ethical and policy questions.

Threats from artificial intelligence and biotechnology might wipe out humanity as we know it. The nature and level of such extreme technological risks (ETRs) are difficult to assess because they have received little serious scientific attention. At the University of Cambridge’s Centre for Existential Risk, scientists are exploring these threats and how we can manage them.

With data storage demands increasing every day, conventional storage will not be enough in the future. Enter DNA-based storage, with its ability to store information on a molecular level, it could revolutionize data storage in the age beyond big data. And researchers have recently came one step closer to making this technology real.

Researchers at Microsoft and the late Microsoft founder Paul Allen’s school of computing science at the University of Washington has built a system of liquids, tubes, syringes, and electronics around a benchtop to deliver the world’s first automated DNA storage device.

DeepMind is definitely at the top of its game with cutting edge projects like AlphaGo, AlphaStar, and, most recently, AlphaFold, but it has even bigger plans. Curiously, it will retain control of any AGI it creates. Granted, an AGI is still years, maybe even decades away. I do, however, find it interesting that DeepMind is already planning a corporate power struggle.

Very Blade Runner-esque, don’t you think?

DeepMind — quite prominently — claims to be the “world leader in artificial intelligence research.” AlphaGo and AlphaStar certainly lend credence to that title, but the Alphabet division’s end goal is artificial general intelligence (AGI). If it ever achieves that landmark accomplishment, DeepMind — and not its parent company — will reportedly retain control.

In this interview with Geoffrey Hinton, Martin Ford asks the pioneering AI researcher about the economics of a world dominated by AI and what to do about making sure the future is for everyone.

If you can dramatically increase productivity and make more goodies to go around, that should be a good thing. Whether or not it turns out to be a good thing depends entirely on the social system, and doesn’t depend at all on the technology. People are looking at the technology as if the technological advances are a problem. The problem is in the social systems, and whether we’re going to have a social system that shares fairly, or one that focuses all the improvement on the 1% and treats the rest of the people like dirt. That’s nothing to do with technology.