Earlier today, I shared Lex Fridman’s discussion on DeepMind’s recent advancement on protein folding.

Join DeepMind  Science Engineer Kathryn Tunyasuvunakool to explore the hidden world of proteins and why this discovery is a big deal.

These tiny molecular machines underpin every biological process in every living thing and each one has a unique 3D shape that determines how it works and what it does.

But figuring out the exact structure of a protein is an expensive and often time-consuming process, meaning we only know the exact 3D structure of a tiny fraction of the 200m proteins known to science.

Being able to accurately predict the shape of proteins could accelerate research in every field of biology.

That could lead to important breakthroughs like finding new medicines or finding proteins and enzymes that break down industrial and plastic waste or efficiently capture carbon from the atmosphere.

Seeker explains how a new kind of nuclear battery could power missions into deep space.

In April of 2020, NASA researchers announced they had come up with a new approach to fusion that has the potential to power missions into deep space, and maybe even future laptops here on Earth. This is really exciting news as when it comes to making energy, nuclear fusion is the ultimate goal because of the promise it holds of clean limitless energy that is available on demand.

In this episode, Seeker tackles the question that’s on everyone’s minds: what will it take to have quantum internet in our home?

Yes, Virginia, a quantum internet is in the works.

The U.S. Department of Energy recently rolled out a blueprint describing research goals and engineering barriers on the way to quantum internet.

The DOE’s latest blueprint for a quantum internet in the U.S. has four key milestones. The first is to make sure quantum information sent over current fiber optic cables is secure. Then to establish entangled networks across colleges or cities, then throughout states, and finally for the whole country.

Scientists might have reached the theoretical limit of how strong this particular material can get, designing the first-ever super-light carbon nanostructure that’s stronger than diamond.

The latest development in the nanoworld of carbon comes from a team that has designed something called carbon plate-nanolattices. Under a scanning electron microscope, they look like little cubes, and the math indicated that this structure would be incredibly strong, but it’s been too difficult to actually make, until now.

The team’s success was made possible by a 3D printing process called two-photon polymerization direct laser writing, which is essentially 3D printing on the level of atoms and photons.

Find out more about this technique and what the result could mean for the future of medicine, electronics aerospace and more in this Elements.

This Seeker video explains.

Artificial sentience straddles the fields of philosophy and engineering.

Throw robots into the mix and it gets really interesting.

Seeker examines what it mean for a robot to be self-aware.

The Creative Machines Lab at Columbia University https://www.creativemachineslab.com/“At the Creative Machines Lab we build robots that do what you’d least expect robots to do: Self replicate, self-reflect, ask questions, and even be creative. We develop machines that can design and make other machines – automatically.”

Commercially viable quantum computing could be here sooner than you think, thanks to a new innovation that shrinks quantum tech down onto a chip: a cryochip.

Seeker explains:

It seems like quantum computers will likely be a big part of our computing future—but getting them to do anything super useful has been famously difficult. Lots of new technologies are aiming to get commercially viable quantum computing here just a little bit faster, including one innovation that shrinks quantum technology down onto a chip.