Ashlee Vance reports on a New Zealand company that has built its own space-plane prototype. Dawn Aerospace hopes to establish a cheap, quick way to transport objects into orbit, and in doing so transform the commercialization of space.

For decades, humans have been trying to make a plane that can reach space and return to Earth by way of a runway. Space shuttles aside, only now is the dawn of the space plane finally upon us.

Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance heads to Finland for a three-part exploration of this traditionally contented country’s tech industry.

Episode One tackles the critical role Nokia once played in its economy, and the devastating impact Apple’s iPhone had on both.

Since then, Finland has managed to revive the sector: Instead of the once-ubiquitous Nokia phone, Helsinki’s vibrant tech scene is now dominated by companies making mobile games like Angry Birds and Clash of Clans.

Microgravity can be used to unlock old materials and make new ones in ways that can’t be replicated on Earth. Private companies know this, and are leading the charge toward the next gold rush. But can they turn low Earth orbit into a home for the next industrial revolution?

Our brain has 86 million neurons connected by 3 million kilometers of nerve fibers and The Human Brain Project is mapping it all.

One of the key applications is neuromorphic computing – computers inspired by brain architecture that may one day be able to learn as we do.

Bloomberg takes a look at the future of non-terrestrial real estate.

Over the past few decades, the International Space Station has allowed astronauts to live, work and conduct research in microgravity. But with the station’s planned retirement by 2030, private companies are being asked to create the next generation of space habitat.